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Tag: reviews

Greg Gossel & David Marc Grant @White Walls
    Thursday, 20 June 2013 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

SAN FRANCISCO --- I was fortunate to beat the crowds to the openings of Greg Gossel's (Minneapolis, MN) Head Over Heels and David Marc Grant's (SF) My Magic Will Bring them Back last Saturday night at White Walls, allowing me to actually see and get photos of the work during the opening.

Like most of the other visitors, it was a quick trip through Head Over Heels, as the pieces all look almost exactly the same, and felt like contrived graffiti in the pristine space. However, entering My Magic Will Bring Them Back, visitors entered an environment, and spent more time with the work. Each piece contains immense detail and the installation helped to tie it all together and created a fun world for visitors to interact with it. Grant was also there talking with visitors, enhancing the inviting atmosphere of the small project space and the crowd seemed to respond by gathering in the small room, even though it was a tight squeeze. The show definitely deserves a visit, and I hope next month, there will be something other than Gossel's hot chicks in the main gallery of the space.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

Greg Gossel, Head Over Heels 1, Mixed-media on Canvas, 48x72", Photo in piece by Bryan Adams

Greg Gossel, Cheap Sunglasses, Mixed-media on Canvas, 72x48", Photo in piece by Neave Bozorgi

David Marc Grant

David Marc Grant, Fictitious Structure #14, Acrylic on panel, 20 x 16"

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Ian Kimmerly @Dolby Chadwick
    Wednesday, 19 June 2013 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

SAN FRANCISCO --- Local painter Ian Kimmerly opened his newest show Continuous Wave at Dolby Chadwick on Thursday night, and these are some of the best paintings I've seen in a while.

The blurry crowds which occupy the deepest space within the painting look like they were printed, rather than painted, onto the canvas, but upon closer inspection, I found that the entire work was paint. Through abstract figures and brushstrokes, accompanied by very precise swatches of color, his work allows viewers to comprehend its construction while also losing themselves within it. It took everything in me not to touch the paintings, as texture of them is unbearably alluring, but I was very satisfied with just looking as well. Although you'll probably miss the sophisticated crowd who was present at the opening, this show is definitely worth a visit before it closes on July 6th.

Words & photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Wendell McShine @Fifty24SF
    Monday, 10 June 2013 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Wendell McShine (lives in Mexico City, from Trinidad) opened his newest show, Raccoon's Law, at Fifty24SF on Saturday night. ARYZ was a tough act to follow, but McShine held his own in the space.

With a combination of a mural, a video, and both drawings and mixed-media works on paper, the diversity of this solo show was impressive. The Raccoon drawings were especially attractive as the way he executed them looked like they actually had fur coming off the page, and you can only imagine how soft it would be to touch. I was lucky to see his work in person through this show, and I hope to encounter more in the future.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph
racehl(at)fecalface.com

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While You Were Away @941 Geary
    Monday, 04 February 2013 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

While We Were Away at 941 Geary is a great show. That's almost enough to say, other than the fact that you should go see it. Curated by gallery director Tova Lobatz, the show features artists from the US and Europe (except for Chanoir who is from Columbia) whom Lobatz encountered in her travels. Along with their works, most of the artists included a suitcase with all the necessary items for their creative process. Whereas How & Nosm obviously carry stencils, Poesia carries a camera and paint-stained T-shirt. Eachartist's label was also in the form of a passport page, giving both biographical information and a quotefrom them. This personal insight, literally seeing into the internal objects of their reality as artists, givesthe show an intimate relationship between curator and artist, and therefore artist and viewer. Now, that is enough to say. Just go see the show before it closes March 2nd.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

Miss Van, Sol y Luna, Acrylic on canvas, 28.5”x36”

Hebru Brantley, My Secrets Keep Secrets, Mixed media on canvas, 56”x56”

Jaybo Monk, I Lay Deaf to Death, Spray paint, acrylic and charcoal, 59”x1.5”x59”

Sten Lex, Untitled 3, Acrylic and stencil poster on wood, 28”x40”

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D Young V @White Walls
    Wednesday, 16 January 2013 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

D Young at White Walls

I am totally over artwork depicting guns. It has been played out as a way to shock viewers and draw inaudiences, and recently, it seems like we just can't escape. Much to my chagrin, D Young V's newestshow at White Walls here in San Francisco is different. There are guns everywhere, but they aren't ploys for attention. Instead, The New Race employs the weapons as commonplace tools necessary for survival in the post-apocalyptic world D Young V has created in the gallery. The entire space is covered in works of ink on paper, reading as militaristic propaganda, complete with ammo and helmets to protect yourself. Arrowsextend from the bottom of several works ending at a pair of footprints, directing the viewer's distance from the piece, suggesting more intimate or more encompassing perceptions of the images.

More importantly, the show starts in the street, tying the space of the gallery to that of the Tenderloinon Larkin Street. Because of this introduction, it is easy to read the work within the gallery as what San Francisco might look like 300 years after civilization has ended. The script extending across the gallery and the pieces themselves intermingle English characters with numbers and symbols, an allusion to the disintegration of language through time. Will we really be speaking English in 300 years? Are we even really speaking English now?

With recent violent events including school shootings, this dystopian future may not be that far off. We may need to arm ourselves and embrace community over individualism, much like D Young V has done within his work. Instead of using the guns as symbols of power, he has introduced them as necessary tools for survival for the entire new race. Through incredibly detailed work, this show emphasizes the need to protect ya neck.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Jonathan Darby @White Walls
    Friday, 23 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Jonathan Darby has completely transformed White Walls gallery into an African setting with his newest show, Congo which runs through December 8th. You can no longer even see the White Walls from which the gallery gets its name. The entire space has been covered with wood panels, pieces of garbage bags, windows, signs, wires, and all kinds of other authentic materials. These have been installed to completely change the interior flow of the space of the gallery, with hidden corners and windows looking like a shop keeper just went to the back to get something for a customer. The space is further emphasized by the quiet rhythm of African drumming and music heard in the background.

All of this would be well and good, but it is the mixed-media pieces hung on these new walls that are really special. Each piece shows the face of a child, presumably one of the children Darby worked with while in Goma, where he taught art lessons. The faces are pasted over a collage of money, newspapers, and patterned papers with things like guns and diamonds on them. The works seem to flow with the walls on which they are displayed and look like they were just panels removed from a building in Goma. However, the careful treatment of the children's faces separates them from any street poster. They are enlarged so that you have to look at them, and they look right back at you. Endearing, powerful, and heartbreaking, these works evoke the spirit of the children themselves, even across the globe.

After winding through the gallery, visitors will find themselves in a very small back room in which a video of Darby's trip to Goma is displayed. The music is much louder here, and you see the children in the pictures, but this time they are actively taking part in their own creative expression. The video shows the children both playing instruments and taking part in art-making practices giving them an active presence of which the medium of the mixed-media panels denies them. The bright colors and movement of the video starkly contrast to the rest of the gallery, overshadowed in brown hues, and provides what seems like a window into another world. This is strategically emphasized by the environment Darby created in which to situate his viewers as conscious and understanding of the people and things around them. The British artist also further emphasized this understanding by contributing a portion of the proceeds of all sales to the children in these school programs you see in the video. So, go take a look at this work. If you decide to buy, it all goes to a good cause, and if you can't buy, you can at least educate yourself in an environment that will take you far away, and some works that will make you both look and think.

Words and photos: Rachel Ralph ~ rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Christopher Burch & John Felix Arnold III
    Tuesday, 20 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

A week ago Friday night, Book and Job Gallery in the Tenderloin branched out from their usual photography displays into some installations and mixed-media work by Christopher Burch and John Felix Arnold III in their new show Found in Darkness: Explorations in Personal Mythologies (through Dec 8th). The crowd was smaller than is usual for this gallery, but this was actually a benefit as it allowed more room to view much larger works. A small two-man band played later in the night, but I personally missed this part of the opening.

Downstairs displays both artists, with the right wall occupied by the detailed drawings of Chris Burch's Br'Er Rabbit figure falling down the existential rabbit hole. The subtle transitions from blue to black and white graphite provide a sensuous background for his figure who looks like a terrified or sneaky trickster. While not visually related, the opposite wall holds The Story of Shy, John Felix Arnold III's large mixed media on wood assemblage. This piece, and his other wood assemblage works, look like they were removed from old decrepit buildings. They are painted with what look like Japanese comic book drawings and phrases on top of layers of old graffiti and spray paint. The wood layers, spray paint, and drawings compound upon one another to provide a complex grounding for the drawings themselves. They seem to resemble fragments of a building that if only you could see the whole building, you could understand the whole mythology drawn and painted upon it.

A trip upstairs revealed two very large installations by each artist. To the right, you were shown In Memory of Shy by Arnold, another wall of wood assemblage, but this time, installed to look as if it was the actual wall of the gallery, covered over by smooth drywall finish at a sharp diagonal. The drawings on this piece span the division between wood and drywall and connect the two so that the division doesn't seem as sharp. A mat of grass extends from the wall, on which a skeleton-moped sculpture, called The Great Debate sits. The skull headlight is really beautiful and the cream coloration extends throughout the bike. It as if you can see a ghost riding through the desert on it; eerie, beautiful, and intriguing. The opposite wall holds an altar installation, a clear tribute to a lost friend. The walls are covered with decadent fabric and sitting in front of it are what look like black bottles, reminiscent of those used in Voodoo rituals. In the center of the wall is Portrait of a Trickster, a painting bringing back the Br'Er rabbit from downstairs and compounding the southern Creole mix of mythology of both Voodoo and folk stories.

Overall, the show was a successful break in the photo-heavy schedule of Book and Job. Since it didn't include as many artists, less friends were probably feeling like they needed to come to the actual opening. However, take the time to go and visit maybe even by yourself, so you can get into the work and reflect on its dark subject matter without the talking and laughing of other gallery visitors.

Words and photos: Rachel Ralph, rachel(at)fecalface.com

Br'Er Rabbit and Br'Er Death in the Land of Shadows by Christopher Burch

The Story of Shy by John Felix Arnold III

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Adam Parker Smith @Ever Gold
    Monday, 19 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

A week ago Friday night, Ever Gold Gallery opened New York-based Adam Parker Smith's newest show Forever 21. The small space was packed with people, and I could very quickly see why; the work is really extraordinary. The only thing I wish was that there was more space to see more of his work, because it is impressive. But this is San Francisco, so space isn't exactly readily available, and Ever Gold balanced the available space perfectly by not overwhelming it with too many pieces. Furthermore, the intimacy of the space really added to the experience.

The gallery door opens to a small entrance space with a sculpture of a VW Bug inside a glass bottle as well as a fabric/painted piece reminiscent of Blinky Palermo's compositions. The VW Bug inside the bottle is painted to every detail, including a hole in the windshield with painted cracks extending from it. The car itself is a detailed sculpture, but placed within the bottle (somehow) it became an outrageously intriguing item. The draped fabric piece with its peachy hue was a great transition into the main gallery, where Smith shows his other sculptures. Unlike the Bug, these sculptures are direct references to gynecological genitalia, but become abject body parts rather than sexual references. These forms are made of foam, bound by rope and remove the fragment of the vagina from the rest of the body, creating a non-sexualized form. Instead of insinuating a sexual viewing of the work, these sculptures allowed pure formal interpretation. Then, placed on marble-like columns, which were bound by bungee cords and emphasized as not being actually marble, these genital forms were raised to classical standards of fine art. This was further connected to the draped front piece, which can either relate to classical dress or another sexual body part, without overt reference.

The rest of the show consists of other sculptures including the whimsical (Untitled) Kanye Shades which is a set of white window blinds cut into the shape of sunglasses. Shown on a white wall, the contrast between the piece and the wall is subtle, and the humor is muted, but insistently present. Also, the monochrome wall helped to balance its opposite wall which was hung with a "marriage proposal" made of sewn-together friendship bracelets. The texture and color of this piece are significant alone, but there is a complex meaning implicit in the fact that they are friendship bracelets and instead of symbolizing one relationship, it includes the connection of thousands.

Finally, the back room of the gallery is tiny, but provides the perfect space for what is displayed. The bodily innuendo of the show is continued with a floor sculpture of a watermelon with an inviting, glowing pink hole. The last corner holds what looks like an altar, with some really complex pieces inside of it. These works look like a poster hung on the outside of your bathroom window, to which you see through the steam after your shower by wiping away the condensation the glass. I am completely clueless as to how he achieved this look, but my god is it effective. Some works have writing and some are just cleared spaces to the poster, but no one could miss out on it; we've all wiped away steam from our mirrors, but more often, we do it to see ourselves, not celebrities who are usually displayed transparently.

Smith's work is so complex that much more could be said about it, but truthfully words don't do it justice – these pieces must be seen in person. I can't wait for the opportunity to see Smith's work in the large space of a museum, which I'm sure is just around the corner for him. For now, Ever Gold has done a great job in showing as much work as possible, and it must have been very difficult to narrow what works would be included in the show, because like me, I'm sure they just want to keep seeing more.

~View photos

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Classic @Fabric 8
    Tuesday, 13 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph


Ursula Xanthe Young @Fabric 8
A week ago Saturday night, I snuck in early to see Classic, a new show at the Mission's Fabric8 with works by Brian Barneclo, Ursula Xanthe Young, and Romanowski, three artists who have been working with the gallery since they opened seven years ago. The space opens with a small shop, and after winding through a back room, you find yourself in a surprisingly open gallery space, which is divided into two main spaces. The first space held the work of Ursula Xanthe Young and Romanowski which emphasized the separation between their feminine and masculine aesthetics. Young's paintings employ a more traditional beauty with deep jewel tones, women, and city/landscapes and would be perfect for placement in any home. This was drastically contrasted to Romanowski's works which had a more militant propagandistic aesthetic. The paintings, which were created using spray paint and stencils on window panes, contained several 45 rpm adapters referencing Romanowski's other role as a DJ and as the gallerist said "man about town."

Romanowski's work carried into the second gallery, with Minister of Super Heavy Funk, a large piece dedicated to James Brown, but then moves into the work of local muralist, Brian Barneclo. These paintings have a little less precision and a little more antiquated quality to them, just like his work on murals throughout the city including one commissioned by the SF Bay Guardian at 135 Mississippi St. It must be a challenge to adapt his aesthetic to the much smaller space of a canvas, but he is able to use this space to bring the local flair of the street to the inside of a home or gallery.

If you're in the Mission, make a trip to Fabric8 to check out the work and the shop. If nothing else, the woman who was running it when I was there is incredibly nice and helpful. There is also a parklet out front, and if you enjoy Young's work, come back soon, as she will be its next designer. I look forward to seeing what these guys are going to do next.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph ~ rachel(at)fecalface.com

Brian Barneclo

Out front Fabric 8

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Steve Fitch @Robert Koch
    Monday, 12 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Steve Fitch (b.1949) opened his newest show, Western Landmarks and Diesel & Dinosaurs at Robert Koch on Thursday night. The space of the gallery is quite large compared to the rest in the building, which allowed plenty of space for Fitch's large-scale photographs. Immediately, viewers were struck by the color in the large works shown in the front of the gallery, depicting neon signs from desolate roads throughout the US. Instead of cheap advertising, the signs are allowed to shine onto the buildings to which they are attached, creating a glowing presence in an otherwise dark terrain. Each work is named after the specific location which it depicts, allowing the titles to flow seamlessly with the works themselves.

The colorful works in the front of the gallery contrast to the black and white photographs in the back. These photographs are mostly figurative, showing the people who may inhabit the towns hidden by the night in the first pictures. They seem to be from a bygone era of American history including diners and circuses, when people actually had to travel to make connections, and they had to use diesel fuel to do so.

The large space allows for a good overview of Fitch's work. Viewers are allowed to see two different series, which relate to, but are distinct from one another. These works have an essentially American character, and their rural settings are a nice break from the heavily urban-influenced work coming from artists working within the city. I suggest taking a trip to Robert Koch to see the works, and allowing yourself the time to take in the quiet atmosphere of the gallery and the subtle historical quality of the work; you may forget you're in the middle of downtown, if even just for a minute.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph ~ rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Lisa Congdon @Rare Device
    Monday, 12 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Friday night brought This is My World, a show of Lisa Congdon's new work to Rare Device (600 Divisadero St). I had never been to Rare Device before, and it is an absolutely adorable little shop. While it may not be the best gallery space, as all of Congdon's work was forced onto the back wall with little to no viewing room, the atmosphere of the shop was the perfect context for the work, so it functioned well. And besides, her works are very small, so viewers would need to be close anyway.

The show has a juxtaposition of abstract, geometric paintings and objects with what look like vintage portraits with drawn patterns around the figures. These portraits were each displayed within a clear plastic bag that has been stitched closed with pink thread, signaling to me a sense of closure with the portraits themselves, but since the thread was left untied, they seemed to be able to be opened again if need be. Like the thread, pink was definitely the color of the show, and it showed up in almost every work shown, giving them all a decidedly feminine attitude.

The femininity of the night was further emphasized by the audience (which were almost all women), the gallery itself, and even the delicious cookies they decided to serve instead of hors d'oeuvres. As a woman, this was a really nice break from the hyper-masculine shows I've been going to and allowed a place for the women's artistic community to gather. Congdon was also at the opening, which allowed many visitors to come and talk to her. Even though she probably won't be there all open hours for the rest of the show, I would suggest getting to Rare Device before it closes on December 31st, but as quickly as the work was selling on Friday, you might want to get there sooner than later.

Full photo slide show

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John DiPaolo @Dolby Chadwick
    Monday, 12 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

At Dolby Chadwick on Thursday night, a crowd gathered for the opening of John DiPaolo's new paintings. The crowd could be heard down the hallway, immediately after exiting the elevator, you were inclined to go to the gallery even if that wasn't your original destination. The crowd opened up to a divided space where DiPaolo's large paintings were given plenty of room to be enjoyed.
~continue reading

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Sagerman & Rubenstein @Brian Gross
    Monday, 12 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph


Work by Meridel Rubenstein
Holy texture, Batman! Robert Sagerman's paintings, which premiered in his show Still Without Cessation at Brian Gross Gallery on Thursday are some of the most textural oil paintings I've ever seen. Van Gogh, eat your heart out. I had to do everything in my power to control my fingers from touching them. The bright and pastel colors of the work are mesmerizing and the shadows enabled by the texture provide a limitless color palette for viewing the works. The works use gradation, either in one direction or with a central focus, to guide the eyes with intended direction over their painted surface. Your eyes will dance with delight over these paintings and will not want to leave them.

The show was one of two opening that night, the second of which was Meridel Rubenstein's Heaven Turned on Its Side: Photosynthesis. She works in large scale photography, capturing moments within different stages of photosynthesis along with the equinoxes. All but one of them are photomontages with layered works, most of which depict natural atmospheric weather and trees. The photograph that does not seem to be digitally manipulated does seem to contrast with the fragmentation of the rest of the works, but because of its size, it works with the rest of the pieces in the show.

Not only the bright colors and textures of Sagerman's work drew audiences, but the fact that Rubenstein was only allotted a very small space in comparison put focus on him as the star of the show. I saw Sagerman at the opening and he was constantly busy talking to collectors and guests. The gallery was busy and many people were there, which speaks to the strength of the work. If you get a chance, please go see these works in person. The pictures below just can't do it justice.

Words and photos: Rachel Ralph ~ rachel(at)fecalface.com

Robert Sagerman

Meridel Rubenstein

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Jim Gaylord @Gregory Lind
    Thursday, 08 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Brooklyn's Jim Gaylord opened his new show, Skipping Over Damaged Area at the Gregory Lind Gallery last Thursday. A small crowd was present, most of who seemed to be making the rounds in the building with all of the other openings happening at several other galleries. The show pairs complex, layered collages with geometric, abstract oil paintings, both of which share a choppy and fragmented aesthetic. The works are not confrontational, but rather provide forms that seem to flow in and out of one another, or in the case of the collages, on top of one another.

One woman exclaimed, "They're amazing!" while looking at the work and I have to say I was partial to the collages rather than the paintings. They provided more depth and complexity, although the paintings are not simple, they do seem somewhat flat. No matter, the work is very high quality, whether painted or on paper, and those that did make the show seemed to enjoy both mediums.

Words and photos: Rachel Ralph ~ rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Rogelio Manzo @Jack Fischer
    Wednesday, 07 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

I wandered into Jack Fischer Gallery last Thursday during the openings at 49 Geary to be pleasantly surprised by the figurative oil and image transfers of Sacramento based Rogelio Manzo's show Retratos Hablados. These paintings have an eerie quality as they seem like ghostly layered characters from the past. This layering also enhanced the texture of the work brought and additional depth not usually allowed by the resin panels on which they are composed.

The space of the gallery is incredibly efficient, and although it is very small, there were plenty of room for the works and for visitors trying to see them. The intimate setting helped to allow viewers to establish relationships with individual works, before they skirted off to any of the other number of galleries within the building. However, Manzo's work is very strong and deserves a time and space all its own.

Words and photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

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Tony Marsh @Hedge Gallery
    Monday, 05 November 2012 /// Written by Rachel Ralph

Tony Marsh shared twelve new works with a very sophisticated financial district crowd last Thursday night @Hedge Gallery. Guests were immediately greeted with wine and hors d'oeuvres (which were very good, by the way) into the brightly lit space that seemed to be glowing from the street. The space is large, so there was room for guests, and there were quite a few who seemed to be enjoying themselves, including a little ballerina.
~continue reading


Tony Marsh @Hedge Gallery in San Francisco


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L'edition Populaire
    Wednesday, 18 June 2008 /// Written by Gabe Ramos


Gabe reviews two books from this French publisher.

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Apenest Vol II
    Thursday, 22 May 2008 /// Written by Jesse Pollock


$30
208 pages, Perfect-bound
Hand numbered edition of 1000

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Dave Kinsey Book
    Tuesday, 18 March 2008 /// Written by Trippe

Published by BLK/MRKT Editions
$20

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Hey Fudge, a book from Travis Millard
    Tuesday, 10 July 2007 /// Written by Jesse Pollock


Published by Narrow Books
$30

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"Arrangement" by Michelle Fleck
Friday, 18 April 2014 10:23

This morning we take a closer look at this beautiful painting by San Francisco based Michelle Fleck now showing at FFDG.

Arrangement measures 24"x30", acrylic and aerosol on panel - inquires: info(at)ffdg.net

Michelle Fleck is a painter living in San Francisco. Her work focuses on the relationship between man and the landscape, and the marks we leave on it. Influenced by everyday life in the city, her paintings serve as snapshots of an ongoing intersection of the natural and man-made world. She strives to make work that has a sense of relevancy in a culture driven by a need for change and newness.

 

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Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:39


Nychos Friday @Fifty24SF
Thursday, 17 April 2014 10:46

SAN FRANCISCO --- You've seen the murals pop up around town the last week from this Austrian street artist as he prepares for his solo show at Fifty24SF opening this Friday, 4/18.

GET THE SHOW DETAILS --- a bunch of NYCHOS

 

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Wednesday, 25 April 2012 10:56

 

Banksy's Mobile Lovers
Wednesday, 16 April 2014 10:47

Speaking of Banksy (wait, were we speaking of Banksy?)... In any case, love his newest creation "Mobile Lovers" located in Bristol, England.

I love you, dear.... Huh? Wut?

 

Jeremy Fish Opening a Solo Show in August at FFDG
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 09:33

Met up with Jeremy Fish last night to catch up and discuss his upcoming solo show opening this August at San Francisco's FFDG. Don't want to give too much away, but the guy is very busy these days. You know the giant pink bronze statue will be built and installed at the corner of Haight and Laguna welcoming those to the Haight (check) in 2015? Going to be incredible.

Check photos from his last San Francisco solo show in 2012, and mark your calendar for August as his next solo show opens at FFDG.

Beering with Fish at his favorite watering hole, Zeitgeist

 

Statue Of A Homeless Jesus Startles A Wealthy Community
Monday, 14 April 2014 10:20

Sculpture of Jesus as homeless and sleeping on a park bench is "freaking out" the neighbors of this wealthy NC suburb. The sculptor, who has an affinity for street art, created it to remind us that "We believe that that's the kind of life Jesus had," Buck says. "He was, in essence, a homeless person." ~READ ON

 

Art or Vandalism? See the World’s First Graffiti Drone
Saturday, 12 April 2014 10:30

I attached a cradle with a spray paint can and other hardware to the drone. I created a series of paintings that are larger, about maybe 3 feet by 3 feet all the way up to 25 feet by 15 feet … And basically, I achieved the perfect air pressure, the perfect weight of the paint and the perfect materials so that the drone didn’t freak out when I attached these mechanisms to it, Katsu said. --continue reading

Think how high those throw ups can be now.

 

OB Shirt by Tucker Nichols
Thursday, 10 April 2014 11:01

Tucker Nichols emailed over this new OB shirt he did for our friends at Park Life which can purchased here for $28.

Speaking of Ocean Beach, if you know, you know, but if you don't... it's not what the average american thinks of when thinking of a California Beach (missing 14 yr. old yesterday). Can't believe we used to drunk naked swim at 3am in the dead if winter... being surfers probably helped us not dying.

 

Open House Sunday - Headland Center for the Arts
Friday, 11 April 2014 16:12

Have you been to the Headland Center for the Arts in the Marin Headlands?

Located in the beautiful ocean-side Golden Gate National Recreation Area, the Headlands artists programs support artists of all disciplines—from visual artists to performers, musicians, writers, and videographers—and provide opportunities for independent and collaborative creative work.

This Sunday's Open House runs 12-5pm - FREE & DETAILS

 

Is It Curtains For San Francisco's Art Scene?
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 09:35

We all know that San Francisco is going through aches and (growing?)/ shrinking artist pains these days as San Francisco property values sky rocket due to the tech infestation going on around the entire Bay Area. Maybe you work in tech and love it, but since this is an art website, we're interested to how this is affecting artists trying to make ends meet.

Some galleries have been forced to close due to 300% rent hikes. Many artists have fled to Oakland, LA and NYC in search of affordable housing and a more vibrant art scene... But we wanna know what you think of how it's going here in San Francisco. How are you making it work? What's your take on the art scene or lack there of? Do you think things are on the up and up or down and out here in San Francisco? Are artists a bunch of complainers and every thing looks great or is it curtains for San Francisco's artistic community? Thoughts

The Rena Bransten Gallery is packing up their 77 Geary space to make way for tech company MuleSoft

 

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Wednesday, 25 August 2010 11:50


+SF

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FULL CALENDARS: BAY AREA | NYC | LA

 


 

 

 

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Ferris Plock - Online Show, April 25th

FFDG is pleased to announce an exclusive online show with San Francisco based Ferris Plock opening on Friday, April 25th (12pm Pacific Time) featuring 5 new medium sized acrylic paintings on wood.


GOLD BLOOD, MAGIC WEIRDOS

Backwoods Gallery in Melbourne played host to a huge group exhibition a couple of weeks back, with "Gold Blood, Magic Weirdos" Curated by Melbourne artist Sean Morris. Gold Blood brought together 25 talented painters, illustrators and comic artists from Australia, the US, Singapore, England, France and Spain - and marked the end of the Magic Weirdos trilogy, following shows in Perth in 2012 and London in 2013.


Jeremy Fish at LA's Mark Moore Gallery

San Francisco based Fecal Pal Jeremy Fish opened his latest solo show Hunting Trophies at LA's Mark Moore Gallery last week to massive crowds and cabin walls lined with imagery pertaining to modern conquest and obsession.


John Felix Arnold III on the Road to NYC

Well, John Felix Arnold III is at it again. This time, he and Carolyn LeBourgios packed an entire show into the back of a Prius and drove across the country to install it at Superchief Gallery in NYC. I met with him last week as he told me about the trip over delicious burritos at Taqueria Cancun (which is right across the street from FFDG and serves what I think is the best burrito in the city) as the self proclaimed "Only overweight artist in the game" spilled all the details.


FRENCH in Melbourne

London based illustrator FRENCH recently held a show of new works at the Melbourne based Mild Manners


Henry Gunderson at Ever Gold, SF

Ever Gold opened a new solo show by NYC based Henry Gunderson a couple Saturday nights ago and it was literally packed. So packed I couldn't actually see most of the art - but a big crowd doesn't seem like a problem. I got a good laugh at what I would call the 'cock climbing wall' as it was one of the few pieces I could see over the crowd. I haven't gotten a chance to go back and check it all out again, but I'm definitely going to as the paintings that I could get a peek at were really high quality and intruiguing. You should do the same.


Mario Wagner @Hashimoto

Mario Wagner (Berkeley) opened his new solo show A Glow that Transfers Creativity last Saturday night at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco.


Serge Gay Jr. @Spoke Art

The paintings in the show are each influenced by a musician, ranging from Freddy Mercury, to Madonna, to A Tribe Called Quest and they are so stylistically consistent with each musician's persona that they read as a cohesive body of work with incredible variation. If you told me they were each painted by a different person, I would not hesitate to believe you and it's really great to see a solo show with so much variety. The show is fun, poppy, very well done, and absolutely worth a look and maybe even a listen.


NYCHOS Mural on Ashbury and Haight

NYCHOS completed this great new mural on the corner of Haight and Ashbury in San Francisco on Tuesday. Looks Amazing.


Sun Milk in Vienna

With rising rent in SF and knowing mostly other young artists without capitol, I desired a way to live rent free, have a space to do my craft, and get to see more of the world. Inspired by the many historical artists who have longed similar longings I discovered the beauty of artist residencies. Lilo runs Adhoc Collective in Vienna which not only has a fully equipped artists creative studio, but an indoor halfpipe, and private artist quarters. It was like a modern day castle or skate cathedral. It exists in almost a utopic state, totally free to those that apply and come with a real passion for both art and skateboarding


"How To Lose Yourself Completely" by Bryan Schnelle

I just wanted to share with you a piece I recently finished which took me 4 years to complete. Titled "How To Lose Yourself Completely (The September Issue)", it consists of a copy of the September 2007 issue of Vogue magazine (the issue they made the documentary about) with all faces masked with a sharpie, and everything else entirely whited out. 840 pages of fun. -Bryan Schnelle


Tyler Bewley ~ Recent Works

Some great work from San Francisco based Tyler Bewley.


Kirk Maxson and Alexis Mackenzie at Eleanor Harwood Gallery

While walking our way across San Francisco on Saturday we swung through the opening receptions for Kirk Maxson and Alexis Mackenzie at Eleanor Harwood Gallery in the Mission.


Jeremy Fish Solo Show in Los Angeles

Jeremy Fish opens Hunting Trophies tonight, Saturday April 5th, at the Los Angeles based Mark Moore Gallery. The show features new work from Fish inside the "hunting lodge" where viewers climb inside the head of the hunter and explore the history of all the animals he's killed.


The Albatross and the Shipping Container

Beautiful piece entitled "The Albatross and the Shipping Container", Ink on Paper, Mounted to Panel, 47" Diameter, by San Francisco based Martin Machado now on display at FFDG. Stop in Saturday (1-6pm) to view the group show "Salt the Skies" now running through April 19th. 2277 Mission St. at 19th.


The Marsh Barge - Traveling the Mississippi River from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico

For some reason I thought it would be a good idea to quit my job, move out of my house, leave everything and travel again. So on August 21, 2013 I pushed a canoe packed full of gear into the headwaters of the Mississippi River in Lake Itasca, Minnesota, along with four of my best friends. Exactly 100 days later, I arrived at a marina near the Gulf of Mexico in a sailboat.


Flavio Samelo's Downtown Sao Paulo Murals

Our buddy Flavio Samelo down there in Brazil does all kinds of great work including this recent mural project in downtown Sao Paulo in front of one of the most important modern buildings of Oscar Niemeyer from the 60's, THE COPAN.


John Trippe, FFDG and Fecalface.com Founder, Stepping Down From Daily Operations

John Trippe, founder, owner and curator of FecalFace.com and the Mission District art gallery FFDG, announced today that he will stepping down from daily operations of the two ventures to seek new career opportunities.


High 5s - Get Your Feet Wet

I purchased one of the first digital cameras when Fecal Face went online in 2000. It was a massive Kodak with 2 mega pixels


"Touching Base" by Schuyler Beecroft

San Francisco based Schuyler Beecroft emailed over the great new series of paintings he's completed entitled "Touching Base", 16x20in on mounted wood panel. Like them.


Flume - Space Cadet (ft. Ghostface Killah & Autre Ne Veut)

Buddies Jay Howell & Jim Dirschberger did this great video produced by Forest City Rockers.


Fire Shelter for Papay Gyro Nights 2014

Last year we posted photos from another one of Simon Hjermind Jensen's Fire Shelters he's made in Copenhagen. This time around the Copenhagen based artist/ designer created one for the Papay Gyro Nights 2014 way up in on the Orkney Islands in Northern Scotland.


"Portrait of a Slugger 19" by Hiro Kurata

Beautiful painting by NYC based Hiro Kurata now on display at SF's FFDG through April 19th as part of the group show "Salt the Skies".


"Veins of Octulen" by Curiot at FFDG

"Salt the Skies" opened on the 21st at FFDG and features this great piece by Mexico City based Curiot (Favio Martinez) whose sold out 2013 show Age of Omuktlans ran at FFDG. His forthcoming solo show is slated for March 2015.


Rome's Alice Pasquini ~Mural+

Rome based multimedia artist Alice Pasquini emailed over a recent mural completed in the historic working class neighborhood of Rome called Tufello.


Project M/3 in Berlin curated by NUART

BERLIN --- Project M is a temporary art project with the objective to improve the neighborhood, to push creativity and to connect people. At regular intervals Urban Nation with director Yasha Young invites a group of internationally reclaimed contemporary urban artists to re-design the facade and shop windows of a prominent residential building in Berlin, while it is being reconstructed.


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