The Juant w/ David Shillinglaw

Our friend, English artist, David Shillinglaw recently returned from "The Jaunt" a travel/ print project by Netherland's based thejaunt.net that produces prints by artists after flying them to new destinations and letting them create an image inspired by their travels. Below are  Shillinglaw's words and photographs of his experiences in the Dutch countryside.

--

“The Jaunt” is an amazing project. The idea is simple; send an artist from one place to another and ask them to make work that responds to that experience. Of course I jumped at the chance. I was given two options and initially chose Serbia, a completely random decision. The curator or as he prefers, travel planner, accepted my decision, but then explained that the 2nd door led to his family home in the Danish countryside. Five minutes from an empty beach, where he and his family would host me, barbecue fine meats and wash my brushes. It was a no brainer. It has been an incredibly full-on year so far and the prospect of spending time in the countryside and being cooked for seemed like the perfect remedy to my recent experiences in London and Amsterdam, which were far from peaceful. 

I am writing this now on the last night of the trip. Time seems to have slowed down, even stopped at points.  A complete contrast to the neon, never-ending buzz of cities I am accustomed to. Last night I recall sitting alone, slightly drunk on Danish beer, resting on the steps of the traditional Danish wooden house. I could hear so little and so much. The noise of traffic and beeps of electronics had been replaced by tree top breezes and the soft crashing of the ocean half a mile away. My busy city brain is not used to this and it moved me. The whole trip has moved me. The hospitality and love has been humbling, spending time with the couples 9month old baby and even celebrating the hosts 30th birthday. 

I can’t remember being so relaxed, especially while at work, a new experience for me indeed. A calmer force has guided the work I made. Watercolours and painted pebbles have replaced the recent explosions of spray paint and bright white spaces of contemporary art galleries. Mother nature has been making eyes at me, offering hints and traces of a much softer approach to rendering an experience. There have been many insights into nature and in a way I did not expect, both in my work and in myself. Even this evening presented the gift of a mother deer and her two fawns grazing on the path we took back from the beach. Maybe there is something in the Danish water, or the beer? But I have re-familiarised myself with the natural world. Only using my phone to play music, not that the area has any reception or Internet even if I wanted it. A true reminder of the basic things, an economy of tools and materials and a look into nature, to feel and see the richness in the plants, animals, weather and landscapes around. I hope this attitude continues, after all London has a lot of nature, but perhaps I needed to detach myself from the bright and shiny distractions to help me focus on it again.    

For more on David Shillinglaw, be sure to check his site: http://www.davidshillinglaw.co.uk

The Business Card Knife

Metal blade and only $25. Not sure of the quality, but it looks like a decently built slim little handy tool. Wonder if you could fly with it? Kinda hope not, actually.

Niels ‘Shoe’ Meulman & Mark Warren Jacques @White Walls

On view at White Walls here in SF is The Unearthly Paintings, the third solo exhibition of paintings by Niels ‘Shoe’ Meulman. Again in his signature style coined “caligraffiti” Meulman created large, text based paintings, many of which feature his signature un-prefix, asking viewers to question certain assumptions in sayings like “keep it real.” Instead, he asks us to “keep it unreal,” a much more expansive and open opportunity for being in the immense vastness that is the cosmos.

Words & Photos: Rachel Ralph - rachel(at)fecalface.com

DSC_0825.jpg

The project space, housing All Night Every Day by Mark Warren Jacques, also presents a space of open possibility. This show feels like a safe trip into space, contained in clean lines and simple shapes, more like Goodnight Moon than the two hour panic attack that is Gravity. It’s inviting and positive, rather than eclipsing in the possibility of endless space. Finished with a collaborative piece with Meryl Pataky (showing in the project space next door) this show, and all the others at both White Walls and the Shooting Gallery, shares a infinite cosmic ethos and provides an uplifting look into worlds outside of our own.

Works by Mark Warren Jacques below:

DSC_0890.jpg

Matt Moore Gets Earthy During his Residency in Utah

We've featured the works of designer and painter Matt Moore over the years and was pleased to receive his latest email featuring a collection of foraged Andy Goldsworthy-esk geometric mandala grids he created during a recent residency at Summit on Powder Mountain in Eden, Utah.

Moore writes, "I decided it was a good play to take full advantage of the sunshine and wilderness and develop a series that would allow me to explore the beauty of Utah, create work with my hands, and celebrate the native color palette of the landscape."

This series of mosaic mandalas was created entirely with elements foraged on the mountain and in the valley : River pebbles and stones, shale, red rocks from the high elevations, dead branches from aspen trees, bark from evergreens, cattails from the lake’s edge, dried wild grasses from yesteryear, and cut dead branches exposing the rings of the tree’s life.

This series of mosaic mandalas was created entirely with elements foraged on the mountain and in the valley : River pebbles and stones, shale, red rocks from the high elevations, dead branches from aspen trees, bark from evergreens, cattails from the lake’s edge, dried wild grasses from yesteryear, and cut dead branches exposing the rings of the tree’s life.

matt_w_moore_utah_mandala_mosaics_1060_2.jpg
At first it felt like playing caveman Tetris, somewhat of a flashback to building block castles I made as a child, but as the configurations evolved to be more complex I very much felt like a graphic artist or bricklayer, every measurement had to be dialed and every pebble or twig needed to be carefully placed.

At first it felt like playing caveman Tetris, somewhat of a flashback to building block castles I made as a child, but as the configurations evolved to be more complex I very much felt like a graphic artist or bricklayer, every measurement had to be dialed and every pebble or twig needed to be carefully placed.

Largest Poster in the World

Everyone has access to illustrator. Almost anyone can create a poster for an event, but why not stand out and create something a little better (and bigger)?!

900 Hours
14 People
175 Liters of paint
280 Plywood Boards
10000 Nails

SNASK have been working with the City of Malmö on the festival Malmöfestivalen for 5 years, Scandinavia's largest city festival. This year is the 30th anniversary and SNASK decided to do something bigger and better ever done before. And what would be nicer than making the biggest poster ever made and turn it into an entire physical area? Said and done this was done during the period of final idea presented in February followed by 4 months of execution. In the end of May it was built up by hand and photographed 30 meters up in the air. In mid August the poster/area will stand on the festival for people to interact with, sit on, jump on and sleep on.

Star Wars Inspired Geometric Art

OMG, this is the best email we've gotten in awhile, and we're not even Star Wars fanatics... just think these works by Adam Lister are wonderful.

I'm a big fan of Fecal Face, great work man!!

I'm an artist that makes geometric paintings of images from pop culture. I've recently been working on a series of Star Wars inspired pictures. I wanted to share these with you and see if they might be of any interest to you and your followers.

I've attached a few images and the link to a new set of limited edition prints that are now available. Feel free to share with your fans.